Oct
16
2013

'Searing Memories of Defaults'–and Selective Memory at the New York Times

Argentina real GDP

It's true that Mexico's default on its debts in 1982 was followed by years of hard times. But Argentine and Russian memories of default are far less "searing"

Sep
24
2013

Asking What Kissinger Thinks–but Not What He Did

Henry Kissinger (cc photo: Brandon)

Henry Kissinger counts on his friends in the elite media to not bother him with questions about his past.

Jun
30
2013

Chalk Another One Up to Free Speech Hypocrisy

Prosecuting chalkers, not banksters.

It seems inadequate for U.S. media outlets to critique the level of free expression in the country where NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden is seeking asylum without comparing it to the level of free expression in the country he is seeking asylum from. While the United States has on paper some of the best guarantees of the right to speak in the world, its practice is considerably more chilling.

Jun
25
2013

Washington Post: Let's Punish Ecuador (Again)

President Rafael Correa

The Washington Post, clearly missing its old left-wing Latin American target, sneers that "replacing the deceased Hugo Chavez as the hemisphere's preeminent anti-U.S. demagogue" is Correa's mission.

Jun
24
2013

ABC Pundits on Snowden: The Center Holds!

abcthisweeksnowden

NBC's David Gregory's "Hey I'm just asking but are you a criminal?" question on Sunday's Meet the Press has been getting a lot of attention, but the Sunday morning discussion of Edward Snowden on ABC's This Week also deserves a look.

May
20
2013

Bum Rap: The U.S. Role in Guatemalan Genocide

Genocidal Guatemalan dictator Rios Montt with supporter Ronald Reagan.

The New York Times report, "Trial on Guatemalan Civil War Carnage Leaves Out U.S. Role," raises at least one obvious question: How much has U.S. coverage of the Ríos Montt trial talked about U.S. support for genocide?

May
10
2013

L.A. Times' Distorted Report on USAID

Evo Morales in the L.A. Times

"USAID Develops a Bad Reputation Among Some Foreign Leaders," read a May 7 Los Angeles Times headline, followed by the subhead: The U.S. Agency for International Development doesn't just offer aid to the poor, it also promotes democracy, which is seen as meddlesome or even subversive. Fighting poverty and spreading democracy–what's not to like? And so, the report seems to suggest, there's something a little off about foreign leaders, nine in recent years, who've expelled the agency.  Why else would Bolivian President Evo Morales expel an anti-poverty group from his "impoverished" country, if he wasn't just a little bit crazy? […]

Apr
24
2013

Jon Lee Anderson Explains: Because I Said So

Jon Lee Anderson

New Yorker staff writer Jon Lee Anderson has a blog post on the magazine's website (4/23/13) addressing the controversy over his recent coverage of Venezuela (FAIR Blog, 4/17/13): At issue are sentences in three different pieces written in the course of a number of months—two on the New Yorker's website and one in the magazine.  Readers pointed out what they saw as factual errors in each. In two cases I agreed, and corrected the sentences; in the third I didn't, for reasons I'll explain. So you expect he's going to explain why he didn't agree that the third alleged factual […]

Apr
17
2013

Why We Need the New Yorker to Correct Its Error on Venezuelan Inequality

Jon Lee Anderson

The New Yorker is a magazine whose name is practically synonymous with factchecking–which makes you wonder how the glaring, major errors in the its recent coverage of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez got through.

Apr
16
2013

USA Today: Venezuelans Voted for High Unemployment and Food Shortages

hugo-chavez-portrait-with-maduro

If USA Today is presenting an objective record of the Chavez years, how on Earth did he win so many elections? By that score, Venezuela must also have an especially ill-informed populace–or maybe Venezuelans know a different reality.

Apr
08
2013

WikiLeaks: Was Chavez Right About U.S. Meddling?

It's no secret that U.S. media loathed the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. Much of that was purely political; sure, Chavez could have given shorter speeches and been nicer to his political opponents–but it's hard to imagine that would have mattered much to, say,  the Washington Post editorial board. One thing that turned up constantly in Chavez coverage over the years was his suspicion that the United States government was looking to undermine his rule. As a Washington Post news article (1/10/13) put it: A central ideological pillar of Chavez's rule over 14 years has been to oppose Republican and […]

Mar
15
2013

NYT: Odd Memories of Iran-Contra, Obama First Term

Reagan image made of jelly beans, Reagan Presidential Library (Photo: Ryan Dickey)

The New York Times' Michael Shear suggests that Rep. Rand Paul's criticism of Obama's drone attacks are nothing out of the ordinary–but he takes a strange trip down memory lane to make the case.

Mar
15
2013

The Pope and Politics

weigel-nbc

Argentine cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was chosen as the new pope this week. But coverage often glossed over the most intense political controversies about him.