Sep
29
2008

Who Decides 'Who Won'?

The New York Times' Jim Rutenberg had a follow-up piece on Friday's debate headlined "The Next Day, a New Debate on Who Won." The story described the McCain and Obama camps' attempts at "influencing the public perception of who won an encounter that produced no clear winner or loser." Except–is it really true that the debate produced no clear winner? The initial polls pointed to Obama as a winner; CNN's poll released Friday night found that 51 percent of respondents thought Obama had done a better job, vs. 38 percent for McCain. CBS's Friday night poll of undecided voters had […]

Sep
29
2008

The Washington Post's World of Hawks

The Washington Post (9/28/08) gathered reactions from "foreign policy analysts and others" to last Friday's debate on international policy, and what's striking is how hawkish the Post's circle of foreign policy experts is. The lineup included Henry A. Kissinger–inevitably–and a bunch of hawks from right-wing think tanks and/or the Bush administration: Danielle Pletka of AEI, Michael Rubin of AEI and Rumsfeld's Pentagon, Patrick Clawson of WINEP (who co-wrote a book with Rubin) and David Makovsky of WINEP. Michael O'Hanlon works at the centrist Brookings but is a famous Iraq hawk. Those who aren't obvious hawks mostly have Republican connections: Michael […]

Sep
29
2008

Press Timidity Boosts U.S. 'Brutality and Criminality'

Veteran reporter Robert Parry muses on his Consortium News website (9/27/98) that "perhaps it's unrealistic to expect a U.S. presidential debate to deal – substantively and honestly – with wrongful actions by the American government"

Sep
29
2008

'A Healthcare Problem, Not a Budget Problem'

Continuing to prove himself as tenacious as the Washington Post is doctrinaire, economist Dean Baker provides another example (9/28/08) of how the "Post editorial board occasionally just makes up numbers to advance its arguments"

Sep
29
2008

Stop the Hate

The National Council of La Raza's campaign to encourage "media networks and political candidates to separate themselves from hate groups and hate speech" targets (9/23/08) talk radio star Michael Savage

Sep
29
2008

The 'Abrogation of Journalism'

FAIR associate Norman Solomon tells Real News viewers (9/29/08) of lessons to be drawn from corporate U.S. media's non-coverage of what was big news overseas during the run up to war on Iraqâ┚¬”U.S. spies used the U.N. arms inspection process to identify future bombing targets and track Saddam Hussein's movements

Sep
29
2008

Is Obama Too Hot, Too Cold … or Just Right?

To illustrate what he deems corporate media's "arbitrary and often contradictory standards set for Barack Obama as a black candidate," Tapped blogger Adam Serwer (9/26/08) quotes a New York Times "Political Memo" by Patrick Healy that complains the candidate "is sometimes out of sync with the visceral anger of Americans who are losing their jobs and homes" because "his tone and volume, body language, facial expressions and words convey a certain distance from the ache that many voters feel." After noting that "this analysis is contradicted by all available polling information," Serwer asserts that "race is the very reason this […]

Sep
29
2008

Local News' PR Epidemic

Reporters of integrity quitting their jobs over what amount to unidentified ads in local news has prompted journalist groups to condemn "broadcast outlets using video news releases that are produced by pharmaceutical companies and healthcare providers to look like news reports." Emily Udell of In These Times has (9/18/08) more on the matter:

Sep
29
2008

Campaign Media's Suspended Disbelief

L.A. Times media reporter Matt Welch (9/26/08) says it's "no wonder John McCain 'suspended' his presidential campaign Wednesday to focus in a bipartisan manner on a grave national crisis," considering how the same move during NATO's 1999 bombing of Kosovo has been called "a masterful political stroke":

Sep
22
2008

Time: Facts, Fables and Fibs by Michael Scherer and James Carney

In "Facts, Fables and Fibs" (9/18/08), Time reporters Michael Scherer and James Carney attempt to sum up the truth and falsity of presidential campaign claims with a gimmicky chart that places Obama and McCain commercials on a grid that separates ads into "Mostly True" and "Mostly False" on the one hand, and "Serious" and "Silly" on the other. In an intro, the Time reporters acknowledge that "McCain has been far quicker to throw the truth overboard–both in advertisements and on the stump," but you'd never get that from the grid itself, which seems chiefly concerned with achieving symmetry, both political […]